Victron Energy

Victron Energy Inverters and Chargers

Click here to read more on how to select an inverter. Before choosing an Inverter for your needs, we recommend you read this page and note the definitions explained. This will help you understand why certain Inverters cost more and others less. These definitions can apply to all makes of Inverters whether they are supplied by us or not.

Victron Phoenix

Developed for professional duty, the Phoenix range of inverters is suitable for the widest range of applications. The design criteria have been to produce a true sine wave inverter with optimized efficiency but without compromise in performance. Employing hybrid HF technology, the result is a top quality product with compact dimensions, light in weight and capable of supplying power, problem-free, to any load.

A unique feature of the SinusMax technology is very high start-up power. Conventional high frequency technology does not offer such extreme performance. Phoenix inverters, however, are well suited to power up difficult loads such as computers and low power electric tools.

Victron Phoenix Inverter
  • 180VA-1200VA
  • 12, 24 or 48V
  • Pure SineWave
Victron Phoenix Inverter
  • 1200VA - 2000VA
  • 12 or 24 Volt
  • Pure SineWave
Victron Energy Phoenix Inverter
  • 12 / 24 / 48 Volt
  • Parallel and 3-phase operation capability
  • Up to 6 Phoenix Inverters can operate in parallel
  • Pure SineWave

Victron MultiPlus

The MultiPlus is a powerful true sine wave inverter, a sophisticated battery charger that features adaptive charge technology and a high-speed AC transfer switch in a single compact enclosure. Models range from 800VA to 5000VA per module.

The MultiPlus will prevent overload of a limited AC source. First, battery charging will automatically be reduced when otherwise an overload would occur. The second level will boost the output of a generator or shore side supply with power taken from the battery. In the event of a grid failure or shore or generator power being disconnected, the inverter within the Multi is automatically activated and takes over the supply to the connected loads. This happens so fast (less than 20 milliseconds) that computers and other electronic equipment will continue to operate without disruption.

Up to 6 Multis can operate in parallel to achieve higher power output. Three phase or split phase operation is also possible. Please check our datasheets to see which models have paralleling, three-phase and split phase capabilities.

Victron MultiPlus Inverter
  • 800VA to 5kVA
  • 12, 24 or 48V
  • Three units can be configured for three phase output
  • Up to 6 sets of three units can be paralleled
  • Pure SineWave

EasySolar

The EasySolar combines a MPPT solar charge controller, an inverter/charger and AC distribution in one enclosure. The product is easy to install, with a minimum of wiring. Up to three strings of PV panels can be connected with three sets of MC4 (PV-ST01) PV connectors.

The MPPT charge controller and the MultiPlus Compact inverter/charger share the DC battery cables (included). The batteries can be charged with solar power (BlueSolar MPPT) and/or with AC power (inverter/charger) from the utility grid or a genset.

Victron EasySolar
  • 1600VA to 3000VA
  • 12, 24 or 48V
  • Pure SineWave

Victron Quattro

The Quattro can be connected to two independent AC sources, for example shore-side power and a generator, or two generators. The Quattro will automatically connect to the active source.

The main output has no-break functionality. In the event of a grid failure, or shore or generator power being disconnected, the Quattro takes over the supply to the connected loads. This happens so fast (less than 20 milliseconds) that computers and other electronic equipment will continue to operate without disruption. The second output is live only when AC is available on one of the inputs of the Quattro. Loads that should not discharge the battery, such as air-conditioning or a water heater can be connected to this output.

The Quattro will prevent overload of a limited AC source. First, battery charging will automatically be reduced when otherwise an overload would occur. The second level will boost the output of a generator or shore side supply with power taken from the battery.

Up to 6 Quattros can operate in parallel to achieve higher power output. Three phase or split phase operation is also possible.

Victron Quattro Inverter
  • 3kVA - 10kVA
  • 12, 24 or 48V
  • Three units can be configured for three phase output
  • Up to 10 sets of three units can be paralleled
  • Pure SineWave

Which solar charge controller: PWM or MPPT?

(Summary of a white paper by Victron Energy)

1. What they do:

The PWM controller is in essence a switch that connects a solar array to a battery. The result is that the voltage of the array will be pulled down to near that of the battery.

The MPPT controller is more sophisticated (and more expensive): it will adjust its input voltage to harvest the maximum power from the solar array and then transform this power to supply the varying voltage requirement, of the battery plus load. Thus, it essentially decouples the array and battery voltages so that there can be, for example, a 12 volt battery on one side of the MPPT charge controller and a large number of cells wired in series to produce 36 volts on the other.

2. The resultant twin strengths of an MPPT controller

a) Maximum Power Point Tracking
The MPPT controller will harvest more power from the solar array. The performance advantage is substantial (10% to 40%) when the solar cell temperature is low (below 45°C), or very high (above 75°C), or when irradiance is very low. At high temperature or low irradiance the output voltage of the array will drop dramatically. More cells must then be connected in series to make sure that the output voltage of the array exceeds battery voltage by a comfortable margin.

b) Lower cabling cost and/or lower cabling losses
Ohm’s law tells us that losses due to cable resistance are Pc (Watt) = Rc x I², where Rc is the resistance of the cable. What this formula shows is that for a given cable loss, cable cross sectional area can be reduced by a factor of four when doubling the array voltage. In the case of a given nominal power, more cells in series will increase the output voltage and reduce the output current of the array (P = V x I, thus, if P doesn’t change, then I must decrease when V increases). As array size increases, cable length will increase. The option to wire more panels in series and thereby decrease the cable cross sectional area with a resultant drop in cost, is a compelling reason to install an MPPT controller as soon as the array power exceeds a few hundred Watts (12 V battery), or several 100 Watts (24 V or 48 V battery).

3. Conclusion

PWM: The PWM charge controller is a good low cost solution for small systems, when solar cell temperature is moderate to high (between 45°C and 75°C).

MPPT: To fully exploit the potential of the MPPT controller, the array voltage should be substantially higher than the battery voltage. The MPPT controller is the solution of choice for higher power systems because of the lowest overall system cost due to smaller cable cross sectional areas. The MPPT controller will also harvest substantially more power when the solar cell temperature is low (below 45°C), or very high (above 75°C), or when irradiance is very low.


PWM Charge Controllers

MPPT Charge Controllers

Battery Chargers

Accessories